Mental Post-Its

Thoughts, Notes, and General Mental Mayhem


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Social Ecclesia Conference Highlights

Screen Shot 2014-04-17 at 6.44.24 PMLast month, I attended a nifty new conference called Social Ecclesia with a few of my co-workers. The premise of the event is to help churches with their social media strategy. I think it’s a pretty great idea. These one-day mico-conferences are being held several times per year right now, and are well worth your time and effort if you are a church leader looking to learn more about developing a social approach to sharing the hope of the gospel.

Here are some of the notes I took away from the day.

Justin Wise

  • Authority in the social media age is determined by “who’s around” not “top down”
  • Media is interactive. It’s relational. Engage.
  • Just because people are seeing content doesn’t mean it’s working.
  • A new media culture values customization (iTunes, Netflix, DVR, Twitter, FB, etc.). You can tell when you put content in front of them that they don’t want. They check out.
  • Offline and online is blurred. Teens see social media as a regular part of life.
  • Social media is the new greeter at your church.
  • The FB generation doesn’t want to go to a church that works like a corporation. They want a flexible, interactive community with a cause.

Carrie Kintz at Focus on the Family

  • Van Gogh: I feel there is nothing more artistic that to love someone.
  • People are expressing their brokenness on social media because they don’t feel welcome at the church.
  • “We’re all stories in the end.” – Dr. Who
  • People who volunteer somewhere have happier lives. We are made to serve.
  • To feel loved we must feel known.
  • The church has hope. We need to share it more on social media. (Matt 5:14-16)
  • Don’t let disaster be the first time someone hears from you or your church.
  • Interact with your city’s hashtag.
  • Pray.

Matt McKee

  • Questions change the conversation.
  • How do we leverage social media for the sake of the Gospel?
  • Does the promise meet the practice? If it doesn’t, we fail. This is super important for churches to understand.
  • Online communication should drive offline conversations.
  • Church isn’t limited to an hour each week. Do you have a strategy for both?
  • Ask what problem are you solving?
  • Online presence: 70% interaction 20 content, 10 stats

Tony Morgan

  • Your communication doesn’t matter if you don’t know what a devoted follower looks like and can’t help move them there.
  • People can’t handle too many options. It gets confusing.
  • Increase church activity doesn’t equal spiritual growth.
  • Do your programs reach people outside the church or only satisfy insiders? Ask, “Which ministries is God blessing?”
  • Are your steps clearly communicated?
  • People are attracted to environments where life change is happening.
  • People generally go where they are invited.

Haley Veturis at Saddleback Church

  • Saddleback.com/weaps – their social media plan
  • 3 out of 4 Americans use social media
  • 2/3 of the global population uses social media
  • 13 hour sof video uploaded every minute on YouTube
  • 100K YouTube videos viewed per day
  • 3 million Tweets per day
  • 5 million minutes per day spent on FB
  • Saddleback social media strategy: Connect. Teach. Share.
  • Engage with the people you care about first. Educate community with great content from teachers and speaking pastors. Expose the community to ministry opps.
  • Follow your followers!
  • Go above and beyond when you can. (Disney does this well.)
  • Keep a pulse on the heartbeat of your community.
  • Empower others to be your advocates.
  • 5 Steps in 5 Minutes
  • 1. Identify a social media champion for your church.
  • 2. Check for consistency across channels.
  • 3. Identify your audience on each channel.
  • 4. Follow your followers.
  • 5. Unlink FB/Twitter accounts.

Dave Willis

  • Do people think your phone is your god because you never put it down?
  • Don’t use social media to impress people, use it to impact people.
  • Choose to be an encourager.
  • If you don’t intentionally pull away from social media periodically, then you’re living your life in a digital prison.
  • The impact of your influence will be determined by the effectiveness of your methods and the purity of your motives. Psalm 19:14
  • Criticism is the price of influence. (Luke 6:26, Rom 12:18)
  • Show respect, even to those who don’t deserve it, not as a reflection of their character, but of yours.
  • The best way to build credibility with people is to consistently practice generosity.
  • Always be more interested in gaining followers for Jesus than you are in gaining followers for yourself.

James Andrews

  • The power has shifted from corporations and institutions to individuals and communities.
  • Customer service is the new PR. Effort matters.
  • Social media is the new main street.
  • Create conversations
  • Start with goals before tactics.
  • Be great listeners.
  • PR/Marketing role is to create, monitor, participate and filter
  • Influences and audience aren’t necessarily the same thing.
  • Be you.
  • Remember there are NO rules.
  • Don’t focus on numbers.
  • Convert social connections into real connections.
  • Give something back. Don’t just take.
  • Experiment continuously.
  • Make it easy for people to create data.


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Volunteer for The Orange Conference

Copyright The reThink Group, Inc. 2013

Copyright The reThink Group, Inc. 2013

All you need to know is that this will be the most fun you’ve ever had over three days. Now go sign up!
Okay, so maybe you need a little more convincing…and begging.
I would LOVE to see you at The Orange Conference this year as a volunteer, April 24-26. It’s my company’s conference for church leaders and ministry teams. We have a whole lot o’ fun and maybe you’ll just learn something in the process. And BONUS—you get a free t-shirt and we feed you during your shift.
We expect to sell out this year, for the first time ever, which means we’ll have 5,600 church leaders packed into the Gwinnett Center in Duluth. It’s a long three days, but everyone is super nice and happy to be there. I’d like to count you among the group. Our volunteers are amazing! We always hear how helpful and nice our volunteers are. We could not host this conference without our volunteers, and many return year after year because they have a great time.
If you’re interested, go here to learn more or sign up. You can list the types of areas you’d like to be in if you have a certain skill or passion. I believe we require at least a half a day commitment.
I’d love to see you there!
PS—As the conference marketing director, I would not mind you paying to attend either. 😉