Mental Post-Its

Thoughts, Notes and General Mental Mayhem


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Tribe Conference 2017 Notes & Quotes

TribeConfThis past weekend I attended my first Tribe Conference in Franklin, Tenn. Unofficially sponsored by various local donut companies, because they got mentioned from the stage so often, this gathering for writers is the brainchild of Jeff Goins. It was only my second writer’s conference, and even though I’m probably not quite the target audience for the group, which focuses mostly on book authors, I really enjoyed it. In fact, I’ve already signed up for next year!

If you’ve been reading this blog for a few months or longer, you’ve likely seen other conference notes on here. I attend a lot of conferences. I LOVE conferences. I’d attend one every month if I could. But the events I usually take part in for my business are often centered on social justice, leadership, entrepreneurship or other business topics. Of course, I write all the time for myself and my clients, but this was a bit of a different slant, which was great, because it meant my brain was working in a different way. So, it was lovely to be around other writers for a few days.

I believe that one of the hallmarks of a great conference is when you see the speakers hanging out with attendees and taking notes—and I definitely saw that at #TribeConf. A couple of the speakers even noted that they had previously purchased tickets to this year’s event not knowing they’d be on stage! Another great indicator. So, if you’re a writer, I’d encourage you to look into this annual gathering.

Below you’ll find all the things I scratched down in my notebook, and I hope you find them helpful.

Jeff Goins, founder of Tribe Conference

  • “Isn’t it interesting that we have to learn shame, but we are born knowing how to dance.”
  • “Real artists don’t have to starve.” (His latest book.)
  • “You may have to ‘behave’ as a writer, before you ‘believe’ you’re a writer.”
  • Conference rules: Be present. Be helpful. Be brave.
  • Most of our failures are invisible to others, but they consume us.
  • “Why does your definition of success not include struggle?” – Jeff’s therapist (for the times we get caught up in what’s going wrong)

Rachel Bagby

  • Check out her Dekaaz for how to reduce complex thoughts and concepts to 10 syllables.

Marsha Shandur, storyteller

  • Author of Off the Mic: The World’s Best Stand-Up Comedians Get Serious About Comedy
  • Marsha taught us how to not be awkward at conferences and in networking. 🙂
  • “Networking is just talking to people you like about things you’re both interested in.”
  • Your storytelling must be vulnerable. (How did you feel? Name the emotion. What was your internal monologue at the time?)

Pamela Slim, small business coach and author of Body of Work: Finding the Thread the Ties Your Story Together

  • Think about your beloved readers.
    • What problems do they face around your topic?
    • What do they aspire to?
    • “Do not define your audience by your demographics; define them by their problems.” – Susan Baier
    • Who do they admire?
    • Where do they go for answers?
    • What do they read?
    • Be the weirdo in the room.
    • What can I create that will solve their problems and light them up?

SESSION 1: HONING YOUR VOICE

Jonathan Fields, serial entrepreneur and growth strategest

  • The Good Life Project and Camp Good Life
  • Author of How to Live a Good Life: Soulful Stories, Surprising Science, and Practical Wisdom
  • “WHAT you say will usually be similar to someone else. HOW you say it will be unique. It’s your voice that makes it different.”
  • “Better input means better output. What are you putting into your process?”
  • You cannot respond appropriately to a “bid” you can’t see. – Gottman Study (a bid is an attempt at getting someone’s attention)
  • “Exquisite attention” allows people to rise to the occasion. – Walk to Listen book
  • People respond not to text, but subtext.

Ishita Gupta, consultant and publisher of Fear.Less Magazine

  • How to Turn Your Mess Into Your Message
    • To find your voice, you have to use your voice.
    • To find your voice, amplify your quirks.
    • Keeping your mess from the world may be slowing your work/art.
    • Her coach tells her, “New level. New devil.” Every success comes with a new challenge.
    • Confidence isn’t a personality trait. It’s a learned skill.
    • Do the scary thing.
    • Use your life and story. Start with solving your own problems and struggles. Others will identify.

Chris Marlow, Help One Now

SESSION 2: ESTABLISHING YOUR PLATFORM

Tsh Oxenreider, The Art of Simple

  • Author of At Home in the World: Reflections on Belonging While Wandering the Globe
    •  Traveling
      • Gives you empathy.
      • Gets you out of a rut.
      • Slows you down. (Provides forced essentialism.)
      • Gives you more perspective.
      • Is good for you as a person. Your audience wants your authenticity.
  • Listen to your frustration. “What am I doing right now because I’m supposed to?”
  • Listen to your life.
  • Dream and scheme.
  • Take the leap and make a plan.
  • Do one thing that breaks the rules.

Sean McCabe, Building an Audience

  • Author of Overlap: Start a Business While Working a Full-Time Job
  • He developed a writing habit of writing 1,000 words per day. Now he writes over 1 million per year. He wrote a 75,000-word book in 15 days!
  • He wrote and created hand-lettering for two years before anyone really noticed.
  • “What if you created as much as you consume?”
    • “I’m tired of reading about the achievements of others.” – Game of Thrones character
  • You have to show up and keep practicing.
    • Get the imperfect words out.
    • You can’t edit what you haven’t written.
    • Your best work is ahead.
      • Studied famous composers. Almost all of them didn’t have their most popular pieces until 10 years into their career. A few had them at years eight or nine, but only a couple, and none prior.
  • Keys to Building an Audience:
    • Curation (kind) – Selectively project a focused thing. Simplify.
    • Consistency (frequency)
    • Quality (value) – Make something remarkable.
    • Time (patience)
  • AudienceBuildingCourse.com
  • Show up everyday. Publish at least weekly. (Daily to stay top of mind.)
  • Doing your normal work is not how to get better. You have to identify your weak spots to improve them. Deliberate practice makes you better.
  • Motivation is a result of doing.

Leslie Newman, Journey to Imperfect

  • “Courage sets things in motion. Determination keeps them going.”

Crystal Paine, Money Saving Mom

  • Author of Say Goodbye to Survival Mode: 9 Simple Strategies to Stress Less, Sleep More, and Restore Your Passion for Life
  • 3 Countercultural Lessons to Building Your Business Without Killing Your Soul
    • Ditch the Hustle
      • Why do we live as if we are a slave to our Inbox? We’re self-employed!
      • Rest is the new hustle.
    • Determine your boundaries.
      • Create a framework for decision-making.
        • Is this commitment in line with my goals for this year?
        • Am I excited about it?
        • Do I have the time, capacity, and energy for it?
        • Are my “people” on board? (ex: family)
    • Dare to focus and finish.
      • One project at a time. (She commits to one thing to learn and one task to complete each week.)

Benjamin Hardy, the #1 Writer on Medium.com

  • Author of How to Consciously Design Your Ideal Future
  • Medium.com tips:
    • Headlines are important.
    • Be bold in your message.
    • Good, easy to read layouts (ex: short paragraphs and using headings)
    • Real, raw emotions work well.
    • Make sure there is a Call to Action in the post. (Must be easy.)
      • Sending to landing page is ok.

Shaunta Grimes, author and teacher at WhatIsAPlot.com

  • Author of Viral Nation series
  • “A story well told can change the world.”
  • “Your books may be your babies, but be prepared to move on to the next one. Your first one may not be successful, and sometimes it takes an entire body of work to get noticed.”

Leo Babauta, ZenHabits.net

  • Author of Essential Zen Habits: Mastering the Art of Change, Briefly
  • The Habits That Built My Blog
    • Solitude
      • Your best work is done in solitude. (including without the internet)
      • Write daily.
    • Connection
      • Get to know your readers.
      • Focus on their problems.
      • Help as much as you can.
      • Put them at the heart of every decision.
      • Put yourself into their shoes.
      • Connect with fellow bloggers.
    • Joy
      • Change lives.
      • Motivate people.
      • Make a connection.
      • Help them move past their fears.
    • Fear
      • Overcome procrastination.
      • Be okay with uncertainty.
      • Find the joy.
      • Relish the groundlessness.
  • How I Build the Habits
    • Have a why and a passion
    • Audience = accountability, connection, and community
    • Start small and lower the barriers to the habit.
    • Set up a positive environment.
    • Deal with the uncertainty.

SESSION 3: EXPANDING YOUR REACH

Dan Miller

  • 48 Days to the Work You Love: Preparing for the New Normal
  • “We become what we think about.”
  • Invest 3% of your income into your success. – Brian Tracy.
    • At $50K, bump it up to 5%.
  • Don’t wait until things are perfect to put your work out there. Try things, get feedback, and edit.
  • Check out The Lean Startup
  • When you’re trying new things, find someone to coach you.

Frank McKinley, author and tribe builder

Jackie Bledsoe, author focused on marriage

SESSION 4: GOING PRO

Ryan Holiday, Meditations on Strategy and Life

  • Author of Perennial Seller: The Art of Making and Marketing Work That Lasts
  • If you want to keep your happy employees, pay the unhappy ones to leave.
  • The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing book – get it
  • How to Last
    • Do the work.
      • If you can rush through it, it’s probably not made to last.
    • Uniqueness
      • Where does your work fit into the market?
      • Where is the least competition? Where can you have the monopoly?
      • What’s the book that only you can write?
    • Timelessness
      • “Focus on the things that don’t change.” – Jeff Bezos
      • Fine the timelessness in the timely.
    • Effectiveness
      • This is the _______ that does ________ for __________.
      • “It’s not what a book is, but what it does.” – Niki Papadopolos
    • Community
      • Who is this for? You have to get your audience right.
    • Time
      • This isn’t an overnight success.
      • Put more time into marketing than creating it. But spend plenty of time creating something great.
      • It’s easier to keep something going than to start and stop.
      • It keeps you humble to keep working.
      • Always taking on hard projects keeps your ego in check.

Natalie Brenner, author of This Undeserved Life: Uncovering the Gifts of Grief and the Fullness of Life

  • She decided to self-publish. (Used Create Space)
  • $3,000 can create a quality self-published book according to Guy Kawaski. This is Natalie’s breakdown:
    • $1,600 for editor
    • $400 for interior layout
    • $300 for cover and social media images
    • What’s left bought the ISBN number and things like that.
  • She recommends Amazon Advantage for pre-orders.

Jon Acuff, author and speaker

  • He recommends Grant Snider’s The Shape of Ideas
  • Has a new book called Finish.
  • 92% of New Year’s resolutions fail, according to a Scranton University study.
  • Your remember incomplete goals more than complete goals. – The Zeigarnik Effect
  • 1. Get the size right.
    • We often believe we can get more done in less time than we actually can.
    • Cut the goal in half to make it 63% more successful.
  • 2. Make it fun if you want it done.
    • We think it needs to be a bad experience to benefit us. (ex: running for exercise when we hate it)
    • We typically measure satisfaction and performance, but we should make fun a metric.
    • Two main types of motivation: Reward and fear.
      • If you want a new idea, finish an old one. (ex: He had the money for new ski boots, but wouldn’t let himself buy them until this book was done.)
  • Eliminate your secret rules.
    • We have secret, unspoken, maybe unconscious things that hold us back.
    • Borrow someone else’s diploma. Learn from others and don’t reinvent the wheel when you don’t have to.
    • Don’t snub a formula. See what works.
    • You’ll never finish if you don’t know the rules.
  • The future belongs to finishers.

 

*Amazon links are affiliate links.

 

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Business Boutique: Notes & Quotes

fullsizerender-14I totally forgot to post about this event after attending in November. Maybe that’s because I feel like I sat with it so long, which is a good thing. One of the facets that I really liked about this event was that the notebook also served as a workbook. So, I’ve had it sitting out since coming back from Nashville just waiting to finish my homework. I’d intentionally set it aside for this year’s personal retreat (more on that soon!), so really, I think my conference experience just ended.

Christy Wright’s Business Boutique is a conference aimed for Christian women entrepreneurs. She started as a Dave Ramsey coach and speaker, and has now moved into this niche, which I believe will thrive. Business Boutique is extremely practical, which I appreciated most of all. And one of the most interesting pieces of the event to me was that it’s aimed at dreamers, starters and builders. The “dreamers” were the people I found most fascinating. I’d never seen a conference aimed at people who had no idea what they want to do! I talked to several of these ladies, and they confirmed that they either had a super vague idea (“I want to sell something online.”) to no idea (“I am open to anything. I just want a change.”) There were also a wide variety of women there from young moms looking for a career or something to contribute to their family, to new or established business owners, to retirees looking to begin again. It was kinda fun to hear the range of stories, backgrounds and ideas.

Outside of this two-day annual event in Nashville, she also has a really good podcast and a series of one-day events around the U.S. during 2017. Her events are extremely affordable, and a lot of fun. I’d definitely recommend this conference to other Christian women entrepreneurs!

But for now, here are just a few of my take-aways:

Christy Wright:

  • Your dream should be so big that if God’s not in it, you’ll fail.
  • If you set your goals before the why, dreams, vision, and mission statement, your goals have no soul.
  • You’ll be the most successful when you stay in your strengths.
  • Stay true to yourself by building your business around your personal values.
  • When talking about your business, focus on the benefit to the customer, not the features of the business. Start with why.
  • If you don’t believe in the goodness of business and making money, you’ll never have a good business or make money.
  • Turning your hobby into a business requires a mind-set shift. Its no longer a part of you. The business is its own thing.
  • You teach others how to value you. If you don’t value your work, no one else will.
  • Faith and fear require you to believe in something that hasn’t happened yet.
  • Fear doesn’t mean you’re doing something bad. It means your doing something bold.
  • Anything that tears you down is not from God.
  • Creating balance in your life comes down to what you spend your time on.
  • Stress and anxiety are caused when there is a disconnect between our values and our behavior.
  • Life balance is simply living from your values.
  • Jesus wasn’t focused on the need. He was focused on the assignment.

Dave Ramsey:

  • Goals must be specific.
  • Goals must be measurable.
  • Goals must have a time limit.
  • Goals must be yours.
  • Goals must be in writing.

Rachel Cruz:

  • Quite the comparisons.
  • Steer clear of debt.
  • Make a plan for your money.
  • Think before you spend
  • Save like you mean it.
  • Give a little…until you can give a lot.
  • Talk about money, even when its hard.

Christine Caine:

  • Impossible is where God starts.
  • You can’t change your past, but you can change your future.
  • Just be willing.
  • God has a plan, purpose and destiny for your life.
  • God always uses unlikely people.
  • It’s the job of the people of God to carry the message of God to their generation.
  • You’ve got to make a decision that what God did for you is bigger than what someone else did to you.
  • A word you’ll never find in the Bible is retirement.
  • Leave a gap in your business that only God can fill.
  • You’re going to have to take a step of faith to step into your God-given gifts.
  • Do not say no when God says go!

Hillary Scott:

  • One door closing is not all of them closing. Resilience and perseverance are required.
  • Have wise counsel and mentors.
  • Be humble enough to ask questions.
  • Remember you’re defined not by others, but by Who created you.
  • “Comparison is the thief of joy.” – CS Lewis

Amy Porterfield:

  • Social media works when you know your ideal customer identity.
  • Social media works when you create original content that serves your ideal customer.
  • Your content should be aligned with, but separate from, your product.
  • Social media works when you ignite action.
  • What does your ideal audience need to experience, be aware of, or believe in in order to want or need your product/service?

Nicole Walters:

  • Sales is not about pushing; it’s about influencing.
  • Sales comes from confidence and confidence is like a muscle; the more you use it, the stronger it becomes.
  • Be kind, but firm. Be specific.
  • It’s your God-given duty to share your gifts with the world.

Donald Miller:

  • Demonstrate empathy and authority.
  • Solve internal and external problems.
  • Give customers a plan.
  • Make your call to action clear.
  • Define how you will improve people’s lives.


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Plywood Presents: Notes and Quotes

FullSizeRender 11This is a conference I look forward to every year. It’s fun, I’m able to see old friends, and it’s locally-focused. The last item is what makes it truly unique. The people who speak are not only inspiring, but most often, they’re doing something remarkable in the Atlanta area. So, while I love hearing big names from big companies, Plywood is really awesome because I can also usually say that the speaker or company is just miles away from me. It gives me plenty of chills and warm fuzzies.

Jeff Shinabarger, Plywood founder:

  • Sit with people that don’t sound like you.
  • Learn from people that you want to sound like.
  • Share with people that engage your advice.
  • Everyone has something to give. Everyone has something to learn.

Gregory Ellison, Fearless Dialogues:

  • Sometimes things have to break down to have a break through.
  • “The longest journey we have in life is from our heads to our hearts.” – a lady he knew growing up
  • “I don’t know how to change the world, but I can change the three feet around me.” – his Aunt Dottie

Hank Fortner, Adopt Together:

  • World Adoption Day
  • People who need love don’t care how old you are.
  • 19 million orphans in the world, 500K in US foster care, 25% of kids who age out of the system are homeless, 80% in jail, 30% are pregnant, 80% end up in prostitution and 56% wind up unemployed. The system is seriously failing these kids.
  • Family is the answer to almost everything.
  • Lots of organizations are doing great things, but they are all working piece-meal instead of in concert.
  • Barriers to adoption are finances, information and community.
  • Adopt Together allows micro financing for adoptions.
  • Lessons learned:
    • Always throw a party.
    • Never give up space.
    • Always remember the details.
    • Never get stuck in the details.
    • Always solve a problem.
    • Never burn a bridge.
    • Always tell your story.
    • Never lose your story.
    • Always give.
    • Never forget extrinsics.
    • Always make money.
    • Always say thank you!

Ron Clark, founder of the Ron Clark Academy:

  • Met everyone of his neighbors and invited them to be a part of the work in this run-down, dangerous neighborhood. It took four months.
  • Passion. Innovation. Creativity.
  • When you bring good energy to a place, negativity leaves.
  • Your team determines your success.
  • Spend 15 minutes on an idea. Decide if it should continue, and then leave it or pour your heart into it.
  • Live like it’s your life!
  • Treat fairly, not equally.
  • Put your energy into the people that actually make a difference, not the negative slackers.

Brian Pape, founder of MiiR:

  • Buy consumer products, then decide where we want the money to be sent. We get follow-up info about the progress of the projects.

Andrea Sreshta, Luminade:

  • Add water to the vessel as the battery. Remove water for the light to go out. Great for disasters and places with little/no light.

Curious Katheryn, 10-year-old entrepreneur:

Patrick, Nisolo shoes:

  • Artisan shoes, ethically-made
  • Focus on work culture. A good culture attracts the right people.
  • They own their supply chain.
  • Check out the book “Essentialism”

Tripp Crosby, producer, comedian, sketch artist:

  • It’s easy to take yourself too seriously.
  • When you’re obsessed with expanding, you risk enjoying the process. And when you’re not enjoying the process, you risk the opportunity to expand.
  • What’s the thing you should be enjoying but you’re not?

Brent Trapp, Booster:

  • Lead with outrageous care.
  • Notice the good things.
  • Obsessive commitment to investing in people.
  • Act like a friend.
  • Live with ridiculous joy.
  • Outrageous care breeds outrageous loyalty.
  • How will you treat your people?

Ruthie Lindsey, speaker/stylist:

  • Love people well.
  • You can live a beautiful life despite your pain and circumstance.
  • Choose joy.
  • There is always hope.
  • When we are open and honest, it forces others to do the same.
  • When we live in our pain, it’s all we can see. We need to find the joy so we can live there instead.
  • Pain can make us better and more whole.

Chris Marlowe, Help One Now:

  • Doing good can be simple and easy. Love first.
  • Find your fight.
    • Find something(s) that you can really dig deep with. Don’t spread yourself too thin. Help where you can.
    • Stick around for the transformation.
  • Go far. Go the distance. Give your life.
  • Go forward. Innovate. Care. Solve.
  • Doing good can be simple and significant.
  • Do good. Do good well. Do good together.

John Lewis, activist and US Representative:

  • We must care for the spark of divine in ourselves.
  • Love may be a slow process, but it’s always worth it.
  • There is power in peace.
  • There is a price to be paid for the work of peace. You must decide if you’re willing to pay it.
  • Without music, the Civil Rights movement would’ve been like a bird without wings. We’d often sing to each other across our cells, both men and women, because we were separated by both gender and race.
  • When you see injustice, make a little noise. Don’t stay silent.
  • “Just love the hell out of everybody.” – MLK
  • Get into good trouble.

Safia Minney, People Tree clothing:

  • Check out her “True Cost” documentary about slavery in the process of making clothes.

Travis Mason, Public Policy and Government Relations at Google X:

  • Macro behaviors are derived from micro moments.
  • Reverse assumptions.
  • Combine domains.
  • Invite the novice.
  • Its the difference that makes the difference.

Kim Biddle, Saving Innocence project:

  • LA County  rescues from child sex trafficking.
  • Average age for trafficking victims is 12-14.
  • 100K children are trafficked per year in the US.
  • We are connected, and deeply affect one another.
  • We are all human. Empathy begins at that place.
  • Impact is relational.
  • Choose to love.
  • Know your season. Run the race. Rest when needed.
  • Keep yourself seen. Cultivate community. Get professional mentors. Find spiritual mentors. Redesign your failures.


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The Orange Conference Live Stream—It’s FREE!

Screen Shot 2013-10-08 at 8.02.48 PM

Over 6,000 of you will be joining us in Atlanta next week! And while we’d love for everyone reading this to be here in person, we realize that’s not always possible. So, we’d like to offer you the next best thing: tune in online! FOR FREE! You’ll be able to see on- and off-stage action, including session streaming, speaker interviews, mayhem and hi-jinx, resource updates and giveaways—and maybe even win a ticket to OC15!

Be sure to RSVP for the Live Stream to receive additional information and special offers. We will not spam you, or sell your info. That’s just rude.

And don’t forget to invite your friends to watch with you!

A full Live Stream schedule will be posted just prior to the conference on this blog.

And if you’re super excited about the Live Stream, but tend to get a little distracted, text “LIVE” to 404-445-2198. We’ll send you text updates about what’s happening, reminders and important info. But we promise not to message you like a sixth grade girl at a One Direction concert.

The Orange Conference, a conference for entire family ministry teams, will be held April 30–May 2, 2014, in Atlanta. Over 5,000 key influencers—senior, next gen, student, children’s and preschool leaders—will gather to experience the power of “Yes,” and learn new insights into influencing the faith and character of the next generation. For more information, please visit www.TheOrangeConference.com.

 

REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION FROM ORANGE LEADERS.


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Social Ecclesia Conference Highlights

Screen Shot 2014-04-17 at 6.44.24 PMLast month, I attended a nifty new conference called Social Ecclesia with a few of my co-workers. The premise of the event is to help churches with their social media strategy. I think it’s a pretty great idea. These one-day mico-conferences are being held several times per year right now, and are well worth your time and effort if you are a church leader looking to learn more about developing a social approach to sharing the hope of the gospel.

Here are some of the notes I took away from the day.

Justin Wise

  • Authority in the social media age is determined by “who’s around” not “top down”
  • Media is interactive. It’s relational. Engage.
  • Just because people are seeing content doesn’t mean it’s working.
  • A new media culture values customization (iTunes, Netflix, DVR, Twitter, FB, etc.). You can tell when you put content in front of them that they don’t want. They check out.
  • Offline and online is blurred. Teens see social media as a regular part of life.
  • Social media is the new greeter at your church.
  • The FB generation doesn’t want to go to a church that works like a corporation. They want a flexible, interactive community with a cause.

Carrie Kintz at Focus on the Family

  • Van Gogh: I feel there is nothing more artistic that to love someone.
  • People are expressing their brokenness on social media because they don’t feel welcome at the church.
  • “We’re all stories in the end.” – Dr. Who
  • People who volunteer somewhere have happier lives. We are made to serve.
  • To feel loved we must feel known.
  • The church has hope. We need to share it more on social media. (Matt 5:14-16)
  • Don’t let disaster be the first time someone hears from you or your church.
  • Interact with your city’s hashtag.
  • Pray.

Matt McKee

  • Questions change the conversation.
  • How do we leverage social media for the sake of the Gospel?
  • Does the promise meet the practice? If it doesn’t, we fail. This is super important for churches to understand.
  • Online communication should drive offline conversations.
  • Church isn’t limited to an hour each week. Do you have a strategy for both?
  • Ask what problem are you solving?
  • Online presence: 70% interaction 20 content, 10 stats

Tony Morgan

  • Your communication doesn’t matter if you don’t know what a devoted follower looks like and can’t help move them there.
  • People can’t handle too many options. It gets confusing.
  • Increase church activity doesn’t equal spiritual growth.
  • Do your programs reach people outside the church or only satisfy insiders? Ask, “Which ministries is God blessing?”
  • Are your steps clearly communicated?
  • People are attracted to environments where life change is happening.
  • People generally go where they are invited.

Haley Veturis at Saddleback Church

  • Saddleback.com/weaps – their social media plan
  • 3 out of 4 Americans use social media
  • 2/3 of the global population uses social media
  • 13 hour sof video uploaded every minute on YouTube
  • 100K YouTube videos viewed per day
  • 3 million Tweets per day
  • 5 million minutes per day spent on FB
  • Saddleback social media strategy: Connect. Teach. Share.
  • Engage with the people you care about first. Educate community with great content from teachers and speaking pastors. Expose the community to ministry opps.
  • Follow your followers!
  • Go above and beyond when you can. (Disney does this well.)
  • Keep a pulse on the heartbeat of your community.
  • Empower others to be your advocates.
  • 5 Steps in 5 Minutes
  • 1. Identify a social media champion for your church.
  • 2. Check for consistency across channels.
  • 3. Identify your audience on each channel.
  • 4. Follow your followers.
  • 5. Unlink FB/Twitter accounts.

Dave Willis

  • Do people think your phone is your god because you never put it down?
  • Don’t use social media to impress people, use it to impact people.
  • Choose to be an encourager.
  • If you don’t intentionally pull away from social media periodically, then you’re living your life in a digital prison.
  • The impact of your influence will be determined by the effectiveness of your methods and the purity of your motives. Psalm 19:14
  • Criticism is the price of influence. (Luke 6:26, Rom 12:18)
  • Show respect, even to those who don’t deserve it, not as a reflection of their character, but of yours.
  • The best way to build credibility with people is to consistently practice generosity.
  • Always be more interested in gaining followers for Jesus than you are in gaining followers for yourself.

James Andrews

  • The power has shifted from corporations and institutions to individuals and communities.
  • Customer service is the new PR. Effort matters.
  • Social media is the new main street.
  • Create conversations
  • Start with goals before tactics.
  • Be great listeners.
  • PR/Marketing role is to create, monitor, participate and filter
  • Influences and audience aren’t necessarily the same thing.
  • Be you.
  • Remember there are NO rules.
  • Don’t focus on numbers.
  • Convert social connections into real connections.
  • Give something back. Don’t just take.
  • Experiment continuously.
  • Make it easy for people to create data.