Mental Post-Its

Thoughts, Notes and General Mental Mayhem


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Solopreneur and Small Business Resources

Solopreneur and Small Business ResourcesIf you’ve ever had a conversation with me, you know I love recommending resources of all kinds. From podcasts to books to products to events—and everything in-between—if I know something that would interest you or that I think you should know about, I feel compelled to share it!

In fact, I have a Resource List on my business website for this very reason. But my clients are primarily nonprofits, social enterprises, and other cause-focused organizations. While this is, of course, awesome, I also know about a lot of resources that aren’t a great fit for them as well. And those items don’t live in any organized place like my business Resource List.

So, for the sake of my other solopreneurs and small business friends (and my sanity), I thought I’d go ahead and include them all here for easy access.

Note: There are obviously a lot of other options besides what I’ve listed below, but these are the ones I refer again and again, as well as have personal experience with. And anything with a * means it’s one of my favorites!

BOOKS

 

PODCASTS

 

EMAIL LISTS

 

CONFERENCES

 

FREELANCE RATES

 

SOFTWARE

 

OTHER BUSINESS TOOLS

 

SAVING MONEY

  • Trim is negotiates lower bills for me
  • Ebates for money back while online shopping
  • Honey for online coupon codes
  • Fetch for saving money on grocery bills (referral code RM8DK)
  • iBotta for saving money on grocery bills ($20 referral bonus)
  • This post on saving money on medical bills
  • Medi-Share for health sharing plans
  • Check out my Travel Hacking 101 post for tips on how I travel to conferences cheaply.

 

MISC

 

And if you are a nonprofit, social enterprise, or other cause-focused organization, you can find more great resources for your business on Signify’s site! 😉

What am I missing? What would help you? What do you need?

PS: If this has been helpful, would you mind sharing it with another solopreneur or small business owner?

 

 

Some links are affiliate links, which means I get a little somethin’ somethin’ for telling you about them. However, I only promote things I know and love!

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My 2018 Reading List

Books I read in 2018One of the other annual posts I love writing, but haven’t had a chance to post yet, is my reading list. Granted, my reading has taken a nose dive over the last couple of years since I started working from home.

That’s because “reading” usually means audiobooks for me. I love Audible! And my commute used to be over an hour, so I’d get through a lot of audiobooks. These days, there is no commute and car time is relatively short, so books have largely been replaced by podcasts. I love podcasts, don’t get me wrong, but I really do miss my audiobooks.

So, though a fairly short list, here’s what I read in 2018:

 

And here are some of the podcasts I recommend:

 

I was even a guest on a few podcasts last year!

 

Need more suggestions?

2017 Reading List

2016 Reading List

2015 Reading List

2014 Reading List

2013 Reading List

2012 Reading List

2011 Reading List

 

Short on time, too? Try Blinkist, which recaps popular books in 10 minutes!

Enjoy!

 

PS: Some links are affiliate links, which means I get a small kick back for introducing awesome people to awesome things. I only promote what I love. 


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My Word for 2019

My Word for 2019So, we are almost a quarter of the way through 2019, and I’m just getting to tell you about my word of the year! Well, it’s par for the course if you’ve seen my last couple of blog posts. I’ve been playing catchup here on the blog, and this has definitely been on my list to share.

Like many times before, I had my concept figured out before last year finished, but it took a little mulling over. I had an idea, a notion, a feeling—but coming up with the right word took me a little while.

Funny enough, I had to wander all the way back to my very first blog post for my company, Signify, to find the right word. But there it was, just waiting for me to reuse.

The concept was about partnering with others for success. Because, if you read my 2018 recap, you know that last year was a hard business year. It was definitely a series of growing pains.

Here’s one of the reasons why…

This may not surprise you, but I have a tendency to do things on my own. I describe myself as “fiercely independent.” Often, I think this can be a good thing. But, in business, it takes a community to get you to where you need to be, even if you’re a solopreneur like me.

And because my business is so intertwined with my life, the words needed to make sense on both levels. Additionally, if you’ve read my word for the year posts before, I also like my words to be verbs. I like the action-oriented feeling behind it.

The other interesting thing about this year’s word is that it was already a concept I’d been talking a lot about in my business. It was sort of this ongoing conversation I was having with my clients and tribe, and then I looked around, and it worked for me, too.

So, what does this all add up to?

SYNERGY.

It’s a beautiful, little word that illustrates the power of people working together.

In business, it’ll be about partnerships of all kinds, such as working with more people on projects in creative ways or seeking more referrals. I’ll also be doing more guest posts, podcasting interviews, and online interviews like I did last year.

Personally, it’s about building relationships as well as reconnecting with people. I was so busy last year that a lot of the people I love fell by the wayside. Some good friends I only saw once or twice during the entire year. Sad! So, I’m going to work on that.

Welp—there you go! That’s my word!

I’m excited about it, and hopeful for 2019.

What’s your word for the year and why?

 

———-

Interested in picking your own word for the year, but need some help? Here are some resources that might help:

———-

My previous words for the year:


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2018 In Review

2018 in Review, by Kristi PorterFriends,

Let me start with an apology. I can’t believe it’s been four months since my last update. Well, actually, yes I can.

I’ve thought about updating you so many times, especially as the end of the year came. But, then it went. And so did the New Year. Work has been crazy, my health has been crazy (per usual), and I frankly didn’t have the energy to be on a keyboard unless it was for my job. Not fun, but there it is.

So many thoughts have been piling up in my head, and today, I finally got a burst of energy where I wanted to sit down and tell you about them. Since last year was a blur, and I was pretty infrequent on updates, I figured I’d just start with a year in review post. So, this should at least get you caught up on what’s been happening here. Hopefully, many more posts to come in 2019!

 

TRAVEL

Okay, let’s start with one of my favorite topics. Last year was an incredible year for travel. That was definitely the thing I had going for me, and very probably, one of the reasons I was so tired. 😉

January: To start the year, I once again kicked things off with a business retreat. I love my quarterly business retreats. They keep me grounded, and allow me to regularly set and review goals with fresh perspective. And I always manage to have some fun as well. For this one, I went to a “resort” (I consider that a loose interpretation) in Northeast Georgia, and stopped by the always entertaining Helen, Georgia, on my way home. (<– Please take a look!)

February/March: Early last year, my friend Raechel and I went to England, Scotland, and Ireland! It was a bucket list trip, and it didn’t disappoint. We obviously covered a lot of ground in two weeks, and I can honestly tell you that I’m ready to go back! Three beautiful countries, wonderful people, and yummy food. We had an absolute blast, and I am so grateful to have had this opportunity with a good friend and excellent travel buddy.

March: About 10 days after returning from that trip, I was off to San Diego! This was for a work conference, but I I found a petsitting gig through TrustedHousesitters.com that allowed me to spend about nine days there, without paying for a hotel. (My link gets you 20% off!) The 90 Day Year Live event was pretty amazing, and I hope to go back again this fall. But, if you’ve been around here for a while, you already know how much I love attending conferences!

May: In May, I went to hang out with some of my best friends in their hometown of Clarkston, Tennessee. Several of our other friends all met there for a women’s retreat at their church, and while the retreat was nice, I cherished this weekend for the quality time I got to spend with people I don’t see near enough.

June: For the first time, I took a friend on one of my retreats. She’s also a solopreneur, so we worked and played. It was a different experience to bring someone along, but also a good change for me. We went to the picturesque Dahlonega, Georgia, and had a great time.

July: I went with my best friend and her family to Charleston for a couple of days. I hadn’t been to Charleston in a number of years, so it was fun to go again, and even more fun to be with close friends. If you’re in that area in the future, be sure to stop by the only tea plantation in the US, which is quite different than the tea plantation I visited in India, but still a unique experience. And free tea tastings!

October: Having been gone so much during the first half of the year, I stayed put for a couple of months. But, boy, did I get out of town with a bang! I took another bucket list trip with my aforementioned best friend—a cross-country Amtrak adventure! Heather and I started our journey in San Francisco, and made stops in Salt Lake City, Denver, Chicago (where she went home), and New York City. It was another trip I’d wanted to do for a long time, and now I am addicted to train travel! I will definitely be getting back on Amtrak in the coming months. (I also did some retreat tasks on the train.)

October: For the second time, I attended Tribe Conference, an event primarily for writers and creative types. My client and friend was there as well, so that made it extra special. I loved my first year, but thought this one was even better. Hope I can make that happen again this fall as well.

December: The end of the year always means my annual trek to Texas. And I was all over the place this year. I connected in Austin, went on to my mom’s house in West Texas, traveled to Lubbock to see my friends from college, drove with mom to my aunt’s house in the Dallas area, and then mom and I took a day trip to Waco to see all things Magnolia. Whew! That all happened in just over a week, and it was extra tiring due to the head cold I picked up on the front end. But it was good to see everyone and celebrate the holidays.

(For more info on how I make a lot of these trips cheap, check out my post on travel hacking.)

 

HEALTH

Let me follow up my favorite section with my least favorite section. As much as I love to travel, and it fills me up in a way almost nothing else does, it’s also very hard on my body. If you’re new to me, I’ve had chronic health issues for almost seven years. It has taken a toll on me in so many ways, and I’m sure others I’m not even aware of.

The super frustrating thing is that I thought 2018 was going to be a real turning point. In late 2017, I started taking this brand new series of supplements that were helping me in a major way. So, 2018 started off awesome from a health perspective. I saw a leap in progress!

Then, after returning from the UK, I was out of these miracle supplements, so I frantically called my naturopath for a refill. Well, turns out that they’d had a terrific effect on people all over the world. Good news, yes, but it kinda caught the manufacturer off-guard, and they ran out. Like, completely ran out of the main supplement!

So, me and these poor other folks not-so-patiently waited for over six months while they had to regrow the herbs and plants that were in this thing. Ugh. So, progress was made, then stalled, and then after the effects of 20+ days of travel in March, I went back to feeling terrible. Like, I had forgotten what it felt like to feel that bad. It was bad. We tried a few other supplements, but nothing worked as well. And it wasn’t until a day or two before I boarded the Amtrak train that I got a refill.

It also takes a couple of cycles (14 days) to work its way into your system. So, basically, I was in holiday mode before I could tell the difference. It was rough, to say the least. And then I huge work project that occupied most of my days and nights at the end of the year, taking up a lot of extra energy. So, all the high hopes I had for 2018’s health report card were dashed.

Prayers said and fingers crossed that 2019 will be a completely different story. That remains to be seen as I picked up that never-ending head cold over the holidays and followed it up with the flu. Sheesh.

Me and Paula Abdul are always two steps forward, two steps back.

 

WORK

Hmmm, where to begin. Last year was a whopper. As Charles Dickens would say, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”

We’ll get the bad stuff out of the way first. It was a rough income year. I was past the 18-month mark in my business, but still learning daily. Things I got right, and definitely things I got wrong.

If you recall, MOMENTUM was my word for the year. And it’s always so interesting how things can turn out very differently than you think. I expected (and worked toward) one thing, and ended up with something different.

The biggest issue was that, unlike 2016 and 2017, I didn’t have enough really big contract clients. I love working with my little guys, and they are who I started my business for, but sometimes it takes the big ones to keep things flush. I did a ton of networking last year, which I’m seeing pay off this year, but it can often be a long-term strategy. (Solopreneurs, small business owners, and freelancers, it’s important to nurture those leads on a ongoing basis—even when things are crazy busy. I neglected that aspect for too long, and it came back to bite me.)

Most of my clients are people I know and referrals, but it still takes time for these things to happen. So, lesson learned. (I hope.)

On to the good stuff! I do really love what I do and who I get to do it with. I work with lots of ideal clients on ideal projects, and am so incredibly grateful for that. No dreading weekdays. Plus, it makes those days when I don’t feel like working much easier.

If you need the crash course on my company: Signify provides copywriting and consulting services to cause-focused organizations, like nonprofits and social enterprises. My goal is for them to get noticed and grow through effective marketing and communications. Additionally, I teach solopreneurs and small businesses how to be more generous through easy philanthropy strategies. It’s fun stuff! And work I deeply believe in.

So, a few of the great things that happened with work last year were:

So, as you can see, it was a big year in a lot of ways.

 

PERSONAL

Well, if you’ve read this far, you may be wondering where I had time for anything personal. And, you’d pretty much be right!

Between travel, work, and health, there wasn’t much left. That’s why this is the smallest segment of this update.

I missed events, hanging out with friends, and many other things due to those trade-offs. Honestly, with the health stuff, I spend most evenings and weekends crashed on my couch. It’s just exhausting, and my body has to gear up for another five days of work.

“Dying is easy, young man. Living is harder.” – George Washington, Hamilton 

I’m trying to reach out and be better about maintaining relationships this year. Baby steps.

Isn’t being an entrepreneur glamorous? Sigh. It’s a self-imposed cage at times for sure, but I’m not giving up on a better work-life rhythm. It takes practice.

 

Okay, I think that’s about it! That’s my 2018 in review!

Again, apologies for my delay in updating you. I hope it won’t happen again, but if it does, I just ask for some grace. I’ll be sure to extend it to you as well. 🙂


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Tribe Conference 2018: Notes and Quotes

Screen Shot 2018-10-30 at 9.43.39 PM

Anne and Me

This past weekend, I attended the Tribe Conference for the second time. I loved it so much last year that I signed up on the spot for 2018. And, wow, this year was even better!

It’s mostly a writer’s conference, but there are lots of creative and artsy people there, which makes it even more fun. Plus, my friend Anne of TrueNorth Freedom Project came along this year! I love attending conferences regardless, but it’s always better with friends.

There are a few reasons why I think #TribeConf is a great event, and stands out from many others. First of all, the speakers are very generous. It’s quite common for them to bring freebies for the audience like books and online courses. Second, many of the speakers hang out at the event before and after their talk. They don’t all swoop in and out just for their portion. Third, other “professionals” attend this event. I saw several well-known speakers posting on social media as attendees. Fourth, it’s usually pretty evident that at lot of the speakers are friends of Jeff Goins, the host, and that just makes for a fun and relaxed atmosphere. And, finally, it’s only about 500 people, so you get to meet a lot of people, as well as the speakers.

Since you guys didn’t get to attend with me, I took lots of notes, and wanted to share them with you. I hope you learn something or feel inspired like I did!

 

  • You cannot avoid rejection and do your greatest work.
  • You cannot make work for everyone and someone. Focus on the one.
    • Who is my work for? How will I think about my work?
  • A brand is a promise.
  • You get more opportunities by saying yes to everything.
  • The secret to being a master is to always keep the mindset of an apprentice.
  • Fall in love with the idea of eventually. Don’t give your success live and die deadlines.
  • It’s about time I _______________. (What goal do you need to start working toward?)
  • “We artificially escalate the consequences of failure.”
  • If you’re doing work that matters, you’ll have rough edges.
  • If you do work that is different, you’re doing something dangerous and worthwhile.
  • People will question your differences now, and celebrate them when you succeed.
  • Once we become good at something, it’s easy to embrace COMFORT and stop growing.
    • You can succeed your way into failure.
    • You can accomplish a task and fail anyway.
    • Adopt new ways to challenge yourself.
    • The creative path is one of growth and resistance.
    • Building a body of work: discovery, emulation, divergence, and crisis
      • At crisis, you can either go back and start over, or stay there and let your work die.
    • Where are my comfort traps?
  • Fear holds us back from creating.
    • Where is fear paralyzing you?
    • Fear is often disguised as wisdom, but it also looks like opportunity.
  • Identify your productive passion.
    • Passion has to do with the outcome, not the task.
    • Passion doesn’t mean easy. If fact, it means pain.
    • “Here I stand” is what it represents.
      • What angers you?
      • What makes you cry?
      • What gives you hope?
  • Define your battles.
    • You can’t fulfill them all.
  • Make something you love everyday for someone who will love it. <— THIS!
  • Are you creating a body of work that reflects who you are rather than your compromises?
  • People will always follow your physical cues, and that’s what they’ll believe.
  • Watch the “power stance” TED Talk
    • Fake it till you become it.
  • What’s the problem you solve?
    • What would your audience say? What keeps them awake? What’s their internal monologue?
    • Think several layers deep.
    • What happens if that problem isn’t solved?
    • It has to be their perspective, not yours!
    • Why is this a problem? Keep dialing down.
    • Use their words.
  • Creative Sandbox Way Guideposts:
    • There is no wrong.
    • Think process, not product.
    • Think quantity, not quality.
    • Think tiny and daily.
    • If you are stuck, just start (anywhere).
    • When in doubt, ask WHAT IF?
    • Take the riskier path.
    • Dismiss all gremlins.
    • Spring the comparison trap.
    • Practice self-awareness and self-compassion.
  • Other people see your work for what it is. You see your work for what it isn’t.
  • Avoiding video is like avoiding a handshake in 2018.
  • Don’t keep the best stuff to yourself.
    • Give it away, and people will still pay you for it later.
  • Be relevant, authentic, and advocate for your brand.
  • Choose your channel:
    • Context is important. Every channel doesn’t work the same way.
    • Example…YouTube: You seek out content (video image and title are important to grabbing initial intention)
    • Example…FB: You just show up (it’s auto-play and there is no audio)
  • Sustain Your Strategy
    • Consistency is key.
    • Average lifespan: Twitter (18 minutes), Facebook (5 hours), Instagram (21 hours), LinkedIn (24 hours), YouTube (20 days)
    • YouTube should be done once per week.
  • Content: Think Hub, Hero, and Help
    • Hub satisfies the content you promised, and will be at least 60% of the content.
    • Hero is for mainstream and subscribers, which is the wildly popular stuff that will be about 10% of the time.
    • Help is for subscribers and and a searching audience, and will about 30% of the time. Here is where you’re trying to get shown in search results.
    • Check out Lowe’s as an example, though they don’t follow the percentages precisely.
      • Behind The Design vs The Weekender vs How To
  • One perfect viewer
    • Make someone feel like you made the content just for them.
  • A book is the key that opens the door to Narnia.
  • Books legitimize you in your industry.
  • 70% of books are bought on Amazon.
  • How to find and refine your book idea for maximum impact:
    • No ideas:
      • What is your expertise
      • What are your most popular topics on your blog?
      • What makes you different?
      • What convos do you have over and over?
      • What are the misconceptions in your industry?
    • Too many ideas:
      • What can I finish the fastest?
      • Most likely to finish?
      • Which idea will make me happy?
        • Prioritize the first two questions.
  • How to write a draft in as little as a weekend:
    • Learn to mind map.
    • Write out everything you know on the topic. (words and phrases)
    • Organize ideas in 4-7 groups, and then into 10-12 chapters.
    • Use the sections to organize into an order/sequence.
    • Mind map, outline, write….repeat per chapter.
  • Marketing your book
    • Get a good cover that grabs attention. (Good art and easy-to-read title. Can people tell after looking at it quickly what it’s about?)
    • Build a launch team
    • Get reviews
  • Use the “look inside” feature on Amazon to get subscribers. He does audiobook version for free. Video series is a good idea, too.
    • He likes to say Amazon is for buyers. Google is for browsers.
  • The truth:
    • You don’t need a ton of marketing for your product.
    • You don’t need a traditional publisher.
    • You need to learn marketing.
  • Put yourself into communities, virtual and real life, where you can use your craft.
  • Community will help you succeed.
  • You can’t stand out and fit in at the same time.
  • Show up around your work with energy. People can feel it.
  • Mindset is everything.
  • Celebrate your weirdness.
  • You build something one brick at a time.
  • Craft first, but not craft only.
  • A mindfulness practice is what all high-performers have in common. Learn to fill your mind with good things.
  • Build remarkable – something people will remark on
    • Brand is the gut feeling people have about you and your organization. It’s not what you say it is, it’s what they say it is.
  • Brand design is the intersection of business context, objectives, and story.
  • Make sure your business has a plan.
  • Brand Value Proposition
    • My/our ______ helps ______ who want to ______ by _____ and _____.
      • My/our (products or services) hep (target customer) who want to (relieve pain) by (selling points) and (creating gains).
  • Stay humble.
    • Learn often from outside your circle.
  • Focus on your uniqueness. Be yourself.
  • Don’t argue with your words.
  • Dream big. Start small. Keep moving.
  • The Master Communicator’s Secret Weapon: Improv
  • 3 Improve Concepts
    • Lead with acceptance (Yes, and…)
    • Become a better listener (listen is an anagram for silent)
    • Don’t fear failure
  • L.I.S.T.E.N.
    • Look interested
    • Involve yourself by responding
    • Stay on target (the person you’re talking to)
    • Test your understanding
    • Evaluate the message
    • Neutralize the feelings (ex: heated argument)
  • “Yes, and….” so you can
    • Open doors to new opportunities
    • Empower your team and improve the culture
    • Become open-minded and innovate
  • Listen better, so you can
    • Become a master communicator
    • Make everyone who talks feel special
    • Increase revenue
  • Don’t fear failure, so you can
    • Become a non-conformist and original thinker
    • Become an admired leader
    • Take risks
  • “With God and Google, you are unstoppable!”
  • How to Get What You Want
    • What holds us back isn’t a lack of knowledge, it’s our thoughts.
    • How to overcome procrastination:
      • 10/10/10 analysis
        • Think about something big you want or want to do.
        • Ask yourself, “How will I feel about this in 10 minutes?”
        • …in 10 weeks?
        • …in 10 months?
      • Once you see the benefits increase and obstacles decrease, you can move forward.
    • How to move forward with confidence:
      • Show up.
      • Be real.
      • Love others.
      • Don’t quit.
    • If you keep waiting for your dream to feel easy, you’ll never stop waiting.
  • “Eat This Poem” – blog and cookbook
  • Writing in the margins – finding the spare time to make things happen over time
  • “Follow your curiosity.” – Elizabeth Gilbert
  • Figure out where to prioritize, and be okay with holding off on other stuff, at least for now.
  • Don’t wait for permission to create your work.
  • Most creators don’t have a marketing plan
  • Marketing isn’t about closing a sale, it’s about opening a relationship
  • 3 identities to every brand
    • Visual
    • Verbal
    • Value
    • Does your brand send a mixed message? Think about if you saw a Walmart slogan on a Louis Vuitton ad.
  • “Success is sequential, not simultaneous.” – Gary W. Keller
    • 7 Steps to Build a Powerful Personal Brand
      • Personal story
        • The messenger is more important than the message.
        • Movement —> Marketing —> Money
        • When you work on your movement, marketing is easy.
      • Platform
        • Most people try to start here.
      • Positioning
        • Your relationship to your competitors
      • Product
        • This is determine by the previous steps.
      • Price
        • Also determined by everything above.
      • Pitch
        • Verbal identity
      • Partners
        • People who want to share and recommend you
  • Think about your products or services. Then add a zero to your most expensive one. Market your product at that level, and also know what you could give someone if they wanted to pay you that much money.
  • Live your message. Love your work. Leave your mark.
  • Check out his latest book, “Running Down a Dream”
  • We all have fears around putting our work out into the world, but how rational are those fears?
  • Even people at the top of their game get scared.
    • We always think if we get good enough at something we won’t be afraid anymore, but that’s not true.
    • We can also get bored if we get really good at something.
  • We need to say out loud what our souls are silently screaming, because it may give someone else the courage to do the same.
  • We are supposed to put our work out in the world for those who came before us, as well as those who will come after us.
  • In order to win in the game, you have to be in the game.
  • Know who your audience is.
    • You can even have a less than perfect product depending on who your audience is and what they’ll pay for. They may just be waiting on you to create something.
  • Research
    • What do people want?
  • Validate
    • Will they pay for it?
  • Secret Sauce
    • ex: How to _____ without _____ (people want pleasure without pain)
    • Three things to focus on: who, what, and how (audience, topic, sales)
    • 6 ingredients
      • A deep and specific topic (ex: spray marketed to keep black cars clean)
        • 4 deep technique (ex: writers – self-publishing – software – scrivener) This is how he got to his Scrivener how to product.
      • A real pain or problem
        • They need to really feel the pain!
        • What happens if they don’t ____. (This is the gap you fill.)
      • Urgent in nature
        • If there are seven categories that define problems, strive to hit in the top three.
      • Willing to pay
      • Ability to pay
      • Something you can be passionate about
  • Affiliates
    • Who else will promote?
  • Exponential growth
    • It comes once all of these things are in place.
  • Find the audience, don’t build the audience.
    • Where do they hang out?
    • Listen to them!
    • What are people complaining about?
  • Where you might get stuck
    • I’m not an expert. (ex: Frank Abagnale was asked how he was such a good teacher on a subject he knew little about, and he said he just read one chapter ahead)
    • I’m don’t have time.
      • Find it in bits. It adds up.
    • I don’t have the tools.
      • Start with what you have.
  • Customer + Product = Awesome person who can do great stuff
  • I help _____ so that _______.
  • What’s the problem you solve?
  • Hire a business coach.
  • Mindset is vital.
  • Get okay with being uncomfortable.
  • She used FB ads to give a discount and get them on her list. Then they bought merch.
  • They story isn’t how brilliant you are. It’s the hard and embarrassing stuff.
  • Content
    • I know how that feels. (ex: empathy, what do you feel comfortable sharing)
    • I need to know this. (ex: how to)
    • I know about this. (ex: easy content like yes/no or multiple choice)
    • This is what I think. (ex: opinion)
  • How can you make everything about your audience?
    • She wanted to promote speaking gigs, so she gave behind-the-scenes on how she puts together a talk.
      • Brad talks into 5-7 minute blocks around a point or story and then storyboard them.
    • When sharing new content, try to start a conversation. Then lead into the post, and share it with those who participate.
  • Everything is a content opportunity!
  • Show, don’t tell.
    • Where does your life intersect your business?
    • What are the stories you share repeatedly?
    • Where in your story do people lean in?
  • Tell the stories people want to hear, not the stories you want to share.
  • Works with Millennials and consults with others about them
  • When it’s all too much…
    • Having a good agent wasn’t enough.
    • What would my work look like if I were okay just being me?
      • Sometimes the best strategy is just the one you will follow.
  • Obsessive Comparison Disorder
    • It’s hard to create anything worth creating if you’re expecting to be affirmed and applauded in the process of creating it.
    • The world is desperately hungry for your signature sauce.
    • What are my failures and personal pain revealing to me about my purpose?
    • Failure doesn’t ruin your story. Failure helps you write it.
    • We don’t connect over present perfection. We connect over shared pain. Will you have the courage to go first?
    • Who will I not be able to help if I give up now?
  • “You need to take responsibility for your own success.” – JB
    • I wanted to begin with people who campaigned me, but I needed to put myself first. People came alongside me later.
  • Your book title and subtitle are extremely important in nonfiction. – CA
  • It’s easy to think about the things you haven’t done or success you haven’t attainted. But remember that there was a time when where you are sitting now was out of reach.
  • “Fully Alive” book turned documentary on Netflix
  • Humility is different than denying the gifts God gave you.
  • 1) The greatest characters of a communicator is having a purpose.
    • To communicate effectively, speak with a specific, singular purpose in every presentation you deliver.
    • Great communication is the intersection of your presentation and people’s wants/needs/benefits…and moves them to action.
    • If you don’t have a purpose in mind, one will subconsciously be assigned to you.
    • “A sermon should be a bullet and not buckshot.” – Haddon Robinson
    • Your speech can ONLY be enabling (how) or persuasive (why).
  • 2) Great communicators have a plan.
    • Have a powerful opening and closing.
  • 3) Great communicators communicate with passion.
    • Powerful illustrations
    • Establish eye contact.
    • Maximize the power of your voice.
    • Let your face match your words.
    • Be your own best critic.
    • Have a passion for excellence.
    • Have a passion for life.
  • Think about:
    • What is my ultimate purpose?
    • What is my plan to get there?
    • What do I do next?